THE SUIT
 

 


The Uniform of Power

If a man runs for president, interviews for a high-level job, or needs a good table at a smart restaurant, chances are he’ll be wearing a suit. The tailored jacket with matching trousers remains the uniform of official power, suggesting civility, diplomacy, and self-control. Suits have way of looking superior. While the context and connotations of men’s suits have changed, their basic form hasn’t.  Despite a turbulent century of social upheaval and changing fashions, the suit remains the proper attire for a man of substance.


Less is More

The essence of the suit’s enduring appeal is its simplicity. The opposite of fast and flashy fashion, a good suit draws upon a century of artisanal wisdom and technical advancement  to enoble its wearer with nothing more than supple cloth and sleek cut. Its form is function: to lengthen the legs, slim the waistline, broaden the shoulders, and present the face.
 

Suit Yourself

So effective are suits in conferring easy elegance that men are once again discovering that they need not be restricted to corridors of power, pomp, or circumstance. With softer construction, richer colors, bolder patterns, and lighter weight cloth than previously possible, today’s suit offers a whole new world of smart yet unfussy dressing.
 

The Flusser House Cut

Since first hanging his shingle as a custom clothier, Alan Flusser has been perhaps the most prominent and consistent advocate for a classic style of Savile Row tailoring known as the the London Drape. First devised in the 1920s by the Prince of Wales’ tailor Frederick Scholte, this cut incorporates soft natural shoulders, high armholes, slight fullness over the chest and shoulder blades, and a subtly shaped waist to produce an elegantly flattering and extraordinarily comfortable coat that traces the natural contours of the body. Our higher-rise, fuller-cut trousers continue the line of the jacket to complete a shapely signature silhouette that confers relaxed authority while conjuring the panache of Anglo-American style in its 1930s heyday.